(972) 709-8761 bzoffice@sbcglobal.net

SEPTEMBER 20TH – SEPTEMBER 22ND

EREV ROSH HASHANA SERVICE: SEPTEMBER 20TH 7:00 PM

TASHLICH SERVICE: SEPTEMBER 21ST 5:00 PM (LAKESIDE PARK – CAN WALK FROM BZ)

BAT ZION CELEBRATION SEPTEMBER 20TH, 7:00PM 
GUEST SPEAKER: DR. JEFFREY SEIF

Dr. Jeffrey Seif has been our beloved speaker on Rosh Hashana for many years now. Seif is the rabbi of Sar Shalom Messianic Congregation in Arlington, Texas, and is also the project manager and Vice President of the Messianic Jewish Family Bible Studies (MJFBS), translators of the Tree of Life Version (TLV) of the Bible. Dr. Seif serves as University Distinguished Professor of Bible and Jewish Studies at The Kings University. He also serves his local community as a police officer. We encourage you and invite you to come out and be a part of our great Rosh Hashana service!!

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What is Rosh Hashana? It is the birthday of the universe, the day G‑d created Adam and Eve, and it’s celebrated as the head of the Jewish year. Rosh Hashanah actually means “Head of the Year” in Hebrew. Just like the head controls the body, our actions on Rosh Hashanah have a tremendous impact on the rest of the year.

It is a day of prayer, a time to ask the Almighty to grant us a year of peace, prosperity and blessing. But it is also a joyous day when we proclaim G‑d King of the Universe. During this time we profess a sweet and prosperous new year to all those we meet by saying “L’Shana Tova”!

The Torah refers to this day as Yom Teruah (Day of Shofar Blowing or Feast of Trumpets).

The central observance of Rosh Hashanah is the sounding of the shofar on both mornings of the holiday except if it lands on a Shabbat. There are 100 shofar blasts sounded on Rosh Hashana consisting of three different types of sounds called out by the rabbi/leader before each blast.

The types of blasts are: tekiah, a long sob-like blast; shevarim, a series of three short wails; and teruah, at least nine piercing staccato bursts.

The blowing of the shofar represents the trumpet blast that is sounded at a king’s coronation. Its plaintive cry also serves as a call to repentance. The shofar itself recalls the Binding of Isaac, an event that occurred on Rosh Hashanah in which a ram took Isaac’s place as an offering to G‑d.

The two days of Rosh Hashanah usher in the Ten Days of Repentance (Aseret Yemei Teshuvah), also known as the Days of Awe (Yamim Noraim), which culminate in the major fast day of Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement.

More information can be found on www.chabad.org, www.hebrew4christians.com, and www.myjewishlearning.com (Parts of this article were taken from these websites).